A draft of the Golden & adjacent Islands, with part of ye Isthmus of Darien .
A new map of ye Isthmus of Darien in America, the bay of Panama, .
- #2117


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DATE: 1710

MAP MAKER: Herman Moll

SIZE: 19" X 23 1/4" (together)

PRICE: $700.00

 

Herman Moll; c1654-1732.

A noted dutch engraver of german descent, Moll emigrated from Holland, and set shop in London around 1680. By the turn of the century, he had achieved prominence in the map publishing business thanks to a tireless production of atlas volumes, geography books, decorative maps and miniature maps, .all of distinguished quality.
He is often credited for being the first mapmaker to use the London meridian as a universal longitude reference.
His "new and exact map of the dominions of the King of Great Britain on ye continent of north America" (also known as the "Beaver map") first issued in 1715, was a basis for the british to counterclaim the french territorial designs after the spanish succession war (1702-1713).
He was often copied by other publishers (of which he was very conscious). But, as was customary at that time, he also made good use of the works produced by his peers.
Among his noted productions: "Atlas Manuale" in 1709, "Atlas Geographicus" in 1711, "The world described" in 1719-1736, "A new description of England and Wales" in 1724 in collaboration with T&J Bowles, reissued under various titles in 1726, 1728, 1739, 1747, 1753; and the 1727 "Atlas minor".

A draft of the Golden & adjacent Islands, with part of ye Isthmus of Darien .
A new map of ye Isthmus of Darien in America, the bay of Panama, .

These two large maps (together: 19" X 23 ") were engraved in 1699 by Moll for inclusion in William Hacke "A collection of original voyages" to illustrate chapter II: "Captain Sharp's journey over the Isthmus of Darien,.".
The present item is state 2, which was printed for a second issue in 1710. The same plate was seemingly reused later, in particular in 1729 for a later edition of the same work, and also in 1721 by John Senex for his "A new general Atlas of the world".
The top map, simplistic and minimalist, is very much in the manner of Robert Morden (cartographer and publisher in London at that time).
The lower map may have been from Hacke or Sharp hand.
They are both evocating the ill fated 1698-1700 scottish colonization attempt in Panama. Both depict a grandiose fort Saint Andrew protecting the walled city of 'New Edinburg'. In reality, the defenses were much more modest, and the town was taken by the spaniards who evicted the scots (many of them relocating in present day USA, establishing new towns often named Darien in memory of their adventure).
No text on verso.

 

 

 

 

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